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Call for Papers

 

Call 1: Ancient Modes of Philosophical Inquiry

Call 2: Forms, Kinds, Essences

Call 3: Logic and Exegesis in the Greek Commentary Tradition

 

 

 

 

Call 1: Ancient Modes of Philosophical Inquiry

 

Deadline: 31 March 2019

 

! Deadline Extended to 30 April 2019

 

At least since Socrates, philosophy has been understood as the desire for acquiring a special kind of knowledge, namely wisdom, a kind of knowledge that human beings ordinarily do not possess. According to ancient thinkers this desire may result from a variety of causes: wonder or astonishment, the painful realization that one lacks wisdom, or encountering certain hard perplexities or aporiai. As a result of this basic understanding of philosophy, Greek thinkers tended to regard philosophy as an activity of inquiry (zētēsis) rather than as a specific discipline. Discussions concerning the right manner of engaging in philosophical inquiry – what methodoi or routes of inquiry were best suited to lead one to wisdom – accordingly became an integral part of ancient philosophy, as did the question how such manners of inquiry related to, and differed from, other types of inquiry, for instance medical or mathematical.

 

It is the ideal of philosophy as inquiry, and the various ways in which ancient philosophers conceived of the manner in which such inquiry should be conducted, that we wish to concentrate on in this issue of Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy, whose preliminary title is ‘Ancient Modes of Philosophical Inquiry’. Its aim is, broadly, to investigate the various ways in which ancient philosophers conducted their philosophical investigations, and reflected on how philosophical investigation should be conducted. In particular, we understand this topic in contra-distinction to the explicit epistemologies ancient authors have put forward (for instance, the theory Aristotle describes in his Posterior Analytics).

 

Please also see the extended call that includes topics we are particularly interested in.

 

According to the current publication plans of Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy, our issue will appear in print in 2020. Since Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy is a peer-reviewed journal, we will need to receive submissions by 31 March 2019.

 

Jens Kristian Larsen (University of Bergen) and Philipp Steinkrüger (Ruhr-Universität Bochum) will serve as Guest-Editors for this volume. For further inquiries, please contact

 

Philipp Steinkrüger (philipp.steinkrueger@rub.de)

Jens Kristian Larsen (jens.larsen@uib.no)

 

 

Call 2: Forms, Kinds, Essences

 

Deadline: 30 October 2019

 

Volume 24 of Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy will explore the history of the closely related concepts of form, kind, and essence. These concepts have been the subject of considerable recent research, in particular within metaphysics and philosophy of science. Yet much of the historical background remains under-researched.

Possible topics for papers are any historical treatment of these concepts within philosophy.

 

Naturally, Aristotle remains the locus classicus, and papers on Aristotle and form (eidos, morphē), kind (genos), and essence (to ti ēn einai) are very welcome. However, other figures are also highly relevant. Platonic ideas are without a doubt an important precursor to Aristotle’s notions. And later treatments of these issues in ancient or medieval philosophy would also fit well into the volume. All three concepts later received much criticism during the early modern period, among others from Descartes, Locke, and Giordano Bruno, to such a degree that these concepts more or less fell out of favour – although, they were also defended or used by philosophers such as Leibniz, Bacon, and Spinoza. Papers dealing with the criticism of forms, kinds, and essences in early modern philosophy, as well as their defense, would likewise be of interest. Despite the early modern critique, forms, kinds, and essences remained parts of philosophy, although they were occasionally seen as eccentric and peripheral. Things changed again in the early 20th century: especially the concept of essence (Wesen) resurfaced in Husserl, as well as Jean Hering and Roman Ingarden. Further, Peter Geach’s essentialism and his thesis of sortal-relative identity have been more or less forgotten, while Saul Kripke’s modal rehabilitation of essentiality has become part of the mainstream.

 

According to the current publication plans of Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy, our issue will appear in print in late 2020. Since Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy is a peer-reviewed journal, we will need to receive submissions by 30 October 2019.

 

Ludger Jansen (Bochum/Rostock) and Petter Sandstad (Rostock) will serve as guest editors for this volume. For further inquiries, please contact

 

Ludger Jansen (ludger.jansen@uni-rostock.de)

Petter Sandstad (petter.sandstad@uni-rostock.de)

 

 

 

Call 3: Logic and Exegesis in the Greek Commentary Tradition

 

Deadline: 1 February 2020

 

The Greek Commentators (broadly conceived, including scholars from the Early Imperial to the Late Byzantine Era) on Plato and Aristotle were the first to apply extensively and systematically both Aristotelian and Stoic Logic to the interpretation of the foundational texts of Western philosophy. Although the Commentators’ original contribution to the formation of categorical and propositional logical theory was limited, their amplification and insightful application of pre-existent logical tools to textual exegesis was pioneering and inaugurated a new way of philosophising through commentary on the authoritative sources of Classical Philosophy. In this sense, the legacy of the Greek Commentators extends far beyond the later developments in the Platonic and Aristotelian traditions of philosophy.

 

This special issue aims at bringing together several perspectives on Platonic and Aristotelian exegesis in the Greek commentary tradition, with a special focus on the logical reconstruction of arguments. How do specific Commentators identify and reformulate the arguments of their sources? What types of syllogistic do they use? What are the aims of such logical reconstructions? What is logical reconstruction supposed to contribute to exegesis in various contexts? Are the proposed reconstructions always successful? To what extent, if at all, do these reconstructions pay justice to the texts under interpretation? How do the Commentators evaluate their sources on the basis of their proposed readings? How do they use logical reconstruction in order to harmonize (apparent) discrepancies in Plato and Aristotle? What is the place of Stoic logic in Platonic and Aristotelian commentaries? How does the resulting complex interplay of authorities ground original philosophical claims?

 

The special issue shall investigate these and other relevant questions with a view to recovering some key aspects of the logical system (in the sense precised above) and of the interpretative methods of the Commentators. We especially encourage papers on syllogistic reconstructions and on (the largely understudied) Byzantine commentaries.

 

Pieter d’Hoine, Jan Opsomer, and Irini-Fotini Viltanioti (all KU Leuven) will serve as guest editors for this volume. For further inquiries, please contact

 

Pieter d’Hoine (pieter.dhoine@kuleuven.be)

Jan Opsomer (jan.opsomer@kuleuven.be)

Irini-Fotini Viltanioti (irinifotini.viltanioti@kuleuven.be)